When funding is available or supports and service are limited due to not enough funding, then this places the participants at great risk.

Examples of risks are:

  • Health risks
  • Some musculoskeletal conditions
  • Overweight and obesity
  • Some forms of cancer
  • Type 2 diabetes.
  • High blood pressure
  • Coronary heart disease
  • Stroke

 

Risk factors for high blood pressure include:

  • poor diet (particularly a high salt intake)
  • obesity
  • excessive alcohol consumption
  • insufficient physical activity.
  • Behavioural risks
  • Biomedical risk factors are bodily states that pose direct and specific risks for health—for example, overweight and obesity and high blood pressure.
  • Modifying behavioural and biomedical risk factors can reduce an individual’s risk of developing chronic conditions and result in large health gains by reducing illness and rates of death.
  • High staff turnover
  • Perceived caregiver stress
  • Power and control issues
  • Negative attitudes towards people with disability demonstrated by family members
  • Lack of awareness and use of formal supports
  • Social isolation and lack of close relationship
  • Communication difficulties
  • Challenging, disruptive, reckless and/or risky behaviour
  • Inappropriate sexual behaviour
  • Learnt over-compliance or complete dependence on caregivers
  • Limited physical mobility
  • Limited sense of personal power, low self-esteem
  • Low income or restricted access to resources
  • Limited sex education or age-appropriate sexual experiences
  • High tolerance of violence
  • Lack of self-protection skills
  • Limited life experiences
  • Lack of knowledge of rights
  • Environmental
  • Cognitive disability may trust too much of others and be easier to trick, bribe, or coerce.
  • A person who has a disability that impacts their ability to communicate face additional barriers to disclose abuse or assault.
  • People with disabilities are told to be obedient, passive, polite, and to control difficult behaviours. This is called compliance training.
  • People with disabilities sometimes grow up without sexuality education, abuse prevention information, or assertiveness education.
  • People with disabilities may be misinformed about their bodies, healthy sexuality, or how to tell if someone is being abusive or not.
  • A person with a mental health diagnoses may be taken advantage of by an abusive person if they cannot tell between reality and non-reality from their mental health symptoms.

 

Common hazards and risks in disability services:

  • lifting, supporting and transferring clients.
  • using equipment like wheelchairs and lifting hoists.
  • work-related stress.
  • occupational violence.
  • slips, trips and falls.
  • bullying and harassment