Capacity Building - Support Coordination

The supports in this support category strengthen a participant’s ability to design and then build their supports with an emphasis on linking to broader systems of support.

white male, 3d model, isolated

Reference: https://www.ndis.gov.au/providers/price-guides-and-pricing

This support item assists a participant to implement their plan by strengthening their ability to connect with the broader systems of supports and to understand the purpose of the funded supports. Support Connection assists a participant to understand their NDIS plan, connect participants with broader systems of supports, and provide assistance to connect with providers. Support Connection will assist participants to achieve effective utilisation of their NDIS plan and answer questions as they arise.

Support Connection also increases a participant’s capacity to maintain (or in some cases change) support relationships, resolve service delivery issues, and participate independently in NDIA processes. Support Connection includes, but is not limited to:

  • Understand the Plan;
  • Connect with Supports and Services;
  • Establish Supports;
  • Coach, Refine, Reflect; and
  • Report to the NDIA.

Where a participant aged 0-6 years is receiving assistance from Partners in the Community (PITC) delivering Early Childhood Early Intervention (ECEI) services, linking the family to a service provider/s (under ECEI best practice principles, a service provider operating under the key worker approach) and support through changes in circumstance will be delivered through Partner arrangements.

Where a participant aged seven (7) and over is receiving assistance from Partners in the Community (PITC) delivering Local Area Coordination (LAC) services, plan implementation and monitoring support will be delivered by a Participant’s Local Area Coordinator.

This support item strengthens a participant’s ability to design and then build their supports with an emphasis on linking the broader systems of support across a complex service delivery environment. Coordination of Supports is to focus on supporting participants to direct their lives, not just their services, and is focussed on assisting participants to build and maintain a resilient network of formal and informal supports. This involves working together with the participant to understand the funding, identify what participants expect from services, and how participants want this designed. Coordination of Supports also includes coaching participants, and working with participants to develop capacity and resilience in their network.

Coordination of Supports includes, but is not limited to

  • Understand the Plan;
  • Connect with Supports and Services;
  • Design Support Approaches;
  • Establish Supports;
  • Coach, Refine, Reflect;
  • Targeted Support Coordination;
  • Crisis: Planning, Prevention, Mitigation and Action;
  • Build Capacity and Resilience; and

Report to the NDIA.

This support is delivered utilising an expert or specialist approach, necessitated by specific high complex needs or high level risks in a participant’s situation. Specialist Support Coordination is delivered by an appropriately qualified and experienced practitioner to meet the individual needs of the participant’s circumstances such as a Psychologist, Occupational Therapist, Social Worker, or Mental Health Nurse. Specialist Support Coordination is expected to address complex barriers impacting a participant’s ability to implement their plan and access appropriate supports. Specialist Support Coordinators assist participants to reduce complexity in their support environment, and overcome barriers to connecting with broader systems of supports as well as funded supports.

Specialist Support Coordinators are expected to negotiate appropriate support solutions with multiple stakeholders and seek to achieve well-coordinated plan implementation. Specialist Support Coordinators will assist stakeholders with resolving points of crisis for participants, assist to ensure a consistent delivery of service and access to relevant supports during crisis situations.

Specialist Support Coordination is generally delivered through an intensive and time limited period necessitated by the participant’s immediate and significant barriers to plan implementation. Depending on individual circumstances, a Specialist Support Coordinator may also design a complex service plan that focusses on how all the stakeholders in a participant’s life will interact to resolve barriers and promote appropriate plan implementation. Once developed, a Specialist Support Coordinator will continue to monitor the plan, but it may be maintained by one of the participant’s support workers or other care supports.

Specialist Support Coordination includes, but is not limited to

  • Understand the Plan;
  • Connect with Supports and Services;
  • Design Support Approaches;
  • Establish Supports;
  • Coach, Refine, Reflect;
  • Targeted Support Coordination;
  • Crisis: Planning, Prevention, Mitigation and Action;
  • Address Complex Barriers;
  • Design Complex Service Plan;
  • Build Capacity and Resilience; and
  • Report to the NDIA.

This support assists the participant to build capacity to undertake all aspects of plan administration and management, including engaging providers; developing service agreements; maintaining records; paying providers; and claiming payments from the NDIA. This support focusses on strengthening the participant’s ability to undertake tasks associated with the management of their supports. This includes building financial skills; building organisational skills; and enhancing the participant’s ability to direct their supports.

Providers of these supports are expected to assist the participant to develop their skills for self-management in future plans, where this is possible.

These support items provide assistance for participants to build capacity and resilience through strong and respectful relationships to support people with psychosocial disability to live a full and contributing life. This support is designed to be able to maintain engagement through periods of increased support needs due to the episodic nature of mental illness. Recovery coaches work collaboratively with participants, families, carers and other services to identify, plan, design and coordinate NDIS supports.

The work of psychosocial recovery coaches requires lived and/or learnt experience. Recovery coaches must have tertiary qualifications in peer work or mental health (minimum of Certificate IV in Mental Health Peer Work or Certificate IV in Mental Health) or equivalent training; and/or a minimum two years of experience in mental health-related work.